Casting Process and Casting Call Dos and Don’ts – Film Riot

Casting

Casting Comments From The film Riot Guys

This is a great video for anyone who is new to casting or just plain needs some fundamental help with the task. There is nothing worse than a casting director with an attitude. Remember, you are dealing with people and people deserve to be treated with respect.
On the other hand, please make absolutely sure that the talent is coachable as well as capable of pulling off the role they are auditioning for. A bad actor or bad choice of actor can spoil your film.

My little tip:

Sometimes, I will ask an actor to do something ridiculous that makes them feel silly or stupid. If they do it and take it in stride, they are more likely to have the kind of personality to take things in stride on set.

Enjoy, and I’d love to hear your comments below. Make sure to follow on Facebook!

Chris Rupert – Wicked Pissa

Introducing my new client director Chris Rupert

His latest piece “Driving Force” was chosen as one of 35 finalists to be showcased at the Shot On Red Film Festival.

“Driving Force” is about how a young guy’s only escape from his miserable job is longing for the gorgeous shop mechanics who don’t even know he exists.  Until the day that one of them fulfills his fantasy by taking control and shattering his reality as they hit the open road.

Watch it here – http://www.indiesessions.com/IS/2013/01/driving-force/

Chris has been working successfully for the last year through a number of production companies in the midwest and east coast but is ready to find a more permanent place to call home.

Please review his Director and DP reel and an assortment of other high-production value videos on his robust website – www.chrisrupert.com 

We are looking to secure him representation with a production company who responds to his compelling and flashy aesthetic.

You can make a direct connection with Chris on his website.

 

Are you ready to elevate your buzz, branding, and exposure in Hollywood – www.wickidpissapublicity.com 

For interviews, bookings, and questions:

Josh Mitchell

Wickid Pissa Publicity

www.wickidpissapublicity.com

Need more YouTube, Facebook, and Twitter – http://wickidpissa.posterous.com/social-media-special-wickid-pissa-publicity

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INDIAN VS. THE CHIEF

Melinda Eisnaugle The Avenue Model & Talent
Melinda Eisnaugle The Avenue Model & Talent

No, we’re not talking baseball here.  We are talking the leaders vs. the followers.  The most important note to make is that as a talent, you must learn how to be both.  The next step after that is learning how to know when to lead and when to follow.

Casting Director Scott Powers shares his advice on the subject of how to follow and when to lead.

The hallmark of a good actor is “takes direction well.” Makes adjustments. As performers, we are many times on the receiving end: being told what to do by a director, photographer, agent, casting director, your teacher. Mom might even figure in there somewhere.

What can happen is that the actor insidiously falls into a trap: the permanent mode of always expecting to be told what to do. And can’t move until. This is where obviously an actor runs into trouble. And can’t quite understand why things aren’t clicking, especially after being so obedient. Remember: only you can advance your career. So much has been written about the necessity of being pro-active [get-off-your-butt] that we won’t re-hash that one more time. But what is most important is: knowing how and when to shift out of the Follow mode and into the Lead mode.

A good rule of thumb: in the in-between times of their not telling you to do something, you should automatically be telling yourself to do something.

Taking this concept one step further: know when to think and when not to think.   Many actors have been in acting classes where the instructor says, “Don’t think,” “Get out of Your Head,” “Don’t Intellectualize,” “Be in the Now.” They are correct when trying to get a truthful performance out of an actor. Here’s what’s forgotten: when you’re finished acting, turn your thinking switch back on and then continue to be able to take care of yourself. Some actors, in learning the craft of acting, have little by little unlearned how to think, dumbed themselves down and have insidiously become helpless, hopeless individuals requiring the care and supervision of friends, family and the kindness of strangers. Do not do this to yourself.

Knowing when to shift gears is a big key to success and longevity. If you’re looking for an industry that runs on yin/yang, right brain/left brain, lead/follow, think/don’t think, passive/aggressive, and an undercurrent of S/M thrown in for good measure; congratulations, YOU’VE FOUND THE RIGHT BUSINESS!

When should you take the lead?  And when should you take direction?